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Archive for March, 2009

parted

Posted by esersahin on 28/03/2009


NAME
GNU Parted – a partition manipulation program

SYNOPSIS
parted [options] [device [command [options…]…]]

DESCRIPTION
parted  is  a disk partitioning and partition resizing program.  It allows you to create, destroy, resize, move and copy ext2, ext3, linux-swap, FAT, FAT32, and reiserfs partitions.  It can create, resize, and move Macintosh
HFS partitions, as well as detect jfs, ntfs, ufs, and xfs partitions.  It is useful for creating space for new operating systems, reorganising disk usage, and copying data to new hard disks.

This manual page documents parted briefly.  Complete documentation is distributed with the package in GNU Info format; see near the bottom.

OPTIONS
-h, –help
displays a help message

-i, –interactive
prompts for user intervention

-l, –list
lists partition layout on all block devices

-m, –machine
displays machine parseable output

-s, –script
never prompts for user intervention

-v, –version
displays the version

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fdisk

Posted by esersahin on 28/03/2009


NAME
fdisk – Partition table manipulator for Linux

SYNOPSIS
fdisk [-u] [-b sectorsize] [-C cyls] [-H heads] [-S sects] device

fdisk -l [-u] [device …]

fdisk -s partition …

fdisk -v

DESCRIPTION
Hard disks can be divided into one or more logical disks called partitions.  This division is described in the partition table found in sector 0 of the disk.

In the BSD world one talks about `disk slices’ and a `disklabel’.

Linux needs at least one partition, namely for its root file system.  It can use swap files and/or swap partitions, but the latter are more efficient. So, usually one will want a second Linux partition dedicated as swap par-
tition.  On Intel compatible hardware, the BIOS that boots the system can often only access the first 1024 cylinders of the disk.  For this reason people with large disks often create a third partition, just a few MB  large,
typically mounted on /boot, to store the kernel image and a few auxiliary files needed at boot time, so as to make sure that this stuff is accessible to the BIOS.  There may be reasons of security, ease of administration and
backup, or testing, to use more than the minimum number of partitions.

fdisk (in the first form of invocation) is a menu driven program for creation and manipulation of partition tables.  It understands DOS type partition tables and BSD or SUN type disklabels.

fdisk doesn’t understand GUID Partition Table (GPT) and it is not designed for large partitions. In particular case use more advanced GNU parted(8).

The device is usually one of the following:
/dev/hda
/dev/hdb
/dev/sda
/dev/sdb
(/dev/hd[a-h] for IDE disks, /dev/sd[a-p] for SCSI disks, /dev/ed[a-d] for ESDI disks, /dev/xd[ab] for XT disks).  A device name refers to the entire disk.
OPTIONS
-b sectorsize
Specify the sector size of the disk. Valid values are 512, 1024, or 2048.  (Recent kernels know the sector size. Use this only on old kernels or to override the kernel’s ideas.)

-C cyls
Specify the number of cylinders of the disk.  I have no idea why anybody would want to do so.

-H heads
Specify the number of heads of the disk. (Not the physical number, of course, but the number used for partition tables.)  Reasonable values are 255 and 16.

-S sects
Specify the number of sectors per track of the disk.  (Not the physical number, of course, but the number used for partition tables.)  A reasonable value is 63.

-l     List the partition tables for the specified devices and then exit.  If no devices are given, those mentioned in /proc/partitions (if that exists) are used.

-u     When listing partition tables, give sizes in sectors instead of cylinders.

-s partition
The size of the partition (in blocks) is printed on the standard output.

-v     Print version number of fdisk program and exit.

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su

Posted by esersahin on 28/03/2009


NAME
su – run a shell with substitute user and group IDs

SYNOPSIS
su [OPTION]… [-] [USER [ARG]…]

DESCRIPTION
Change the effective user id and group id to that of USER.

-, -l, –login
make the shell a login shell

-c, –command=COMMAND
pass a single COMMAND to the shell with -c

-f, –fast
pass -f to the shell (for csh or tcsh)

-m, –preserve-environment
do not reset environment variables

-p     same as -m

-s, –shell=SHELL
run SHELL if /etc/shells allows it

–help display this help and exit

–version
output version information and exit

A mere – implies -l.   If USER not given, assume root.

AUTHOR
Written by David MacKenzie.

REPORTING BUGS
Report bugs to <bug-coreutils@gnu.org>.

COPYRIGHT
Copyright © 2008 Free Software Foundation, Inc.  License GPLv3+: GNU GPL version 3 or later <http://gnu.org/licenses/gpl.html&gt;
This is free software: you are free to change and redistribute it.  There is NO WARRANTY, to the extent permitted by law.

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uname

Posted by esersahin on 28/03/2009


NAME
     uname - print name of current system

SYNOPSIS
     uname [-aimnprsvX]

     uname [-S system_name]

DESCRIPTION
     The uname utility prints information about the current  sys-
     tem on the standard output. When options are specified, sym-
     bols representing one or more system characteristics will be
     written to the standard output. If no options are specified,
     uname  prints  the  current  operating  system's  name.  The
     options  print  selected  information  returned by uname(2)
     sysinfo(2), or both.

OPTIONS
     The following options are supported:

     -a              Prints basic information currently available
                     from the system.

     -i              Prints the name of the platform.

     -m              Prints the machine  hardware  name  (class).
                     Use of this option is discouraged. Use uname
                     -p instead. See NOTES section below.

     -n              Prints the nodename  (the  nodename  is  the
                     name  by which the system is known to a com-
                     munications network).

     -p              Prints the current host's ISA  or  processor
                     type.

     -r              Prints the operating system release level.

     -s              Prints the name  of  the  operating  system.
                     This is the default.

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Setting up VMware Workstation

Posted by esersahin on 28/03/2009


http://en.opensuse.org/Setting_up_VMware_Workstation

Posted in Linux, OpenSuse, VMware | Leave a Comment »

Setting up SUSE Linux as a VMware Guest

Posted by esersahin on 28/03/2009


http://en.opensuse.org/Setting_up_SUSE_Linux_as_a_VMware_Guest

Posted in Linux, OpenSuse, VMware | Leave a Comment »

VMware İş İstasyonunu Bir Çekirdek Güncellemesinden Sonra Düzeltme

Posted by esersahin on 28/03/2009


http://tr.opensuse.org/VMware_%C4%B0%C5%9F_%C4%B0stasyonunu_Bir_%C3%87ekirdek_G%C3%BCncellemesinden_Sonra_D%C3%BCzeltme

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GNOME 2.26 Released – openSUSE 11.1

Posted by esersahin on 28/03/2009


http://www.benkevan.com/blog/gnome-226-released-opensuse-111/

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Amarok 2.0.2 Release – One step closer to perfection

Posted by esersahin on 28/03/2009


http://www.benkevan.com/blog/amarok-202-release-one-step-closer-to-perfection/

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KOffice 2.0 Beta 7 Released

Posted by esersahin on 28/03/2009


http://www.benkevan.com/blog/koffice-20-beta-7-released/

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